Taking Simple Steps

Sharing the process of transitioning to a more sustainable lifestyle


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Call To Action

After hanging damp sheets on the line

Writing a check due the IRS

And baking russet potatoes

 

After calling elder friends to say “hi”

Texting my West Coast niece Ella

Watering broccoli rabe and tomatoes

 

After dodging traffic downtown

To teach Amanda how

To plan and outline an essay

 

Pumping cheap unleaded gas

Buying bulk black beans and jarred molasses

Hearing Chris Hedges on Alternative Radio

 

Through unloading my stuffed car

Unpacking my cloth bags

Washing bowls now grown crusty

 

Skimming high piles of mail

Recycling unwanted ads

Jotting my to dos for tomorrow

 

I stretch by beeswax candlelight

On a warm cotton blanket

By the cool terrazzo floor

 

And sit on the futon’s edge

Reviewing my day passed

I pray for students and family and friends

Then turn on the lamp

To read Steiner’s Philosophy of Freedom

 

When words begin to jumble

Meaninglessly

In circles

My mind drifting

Toward night’s sky

 

I close the cover

Switch off the light

Turn down the sheets

And lie to sleep

 

After myriad in and out breaths

Way past midnight

Beyond din of traffic

And glow of lamp light

 

Deep in stillness

Stars shining

Moon beaming

Planets whirling

My body lying

In slumber

 

I soar through night’s sky

Amongst others

Remembering

Regaining

Restoring

 

With heavenly bodies

I review my purpose

Rekindle aspiration

Realign my intent

 

Then with the sun’s first glimmer

My body revived

Through rest

From my spirit-soul’s absence

 

Now returned to bed

I awake

To hear, Call to action!

Sounding through my dormant mind

 

Turn off the radio

Turn down the lights

Close that book

Silence your smart phone

 

Put down your pen

And pad

And date book

 

Let go the million scattered pieces

Of things to do

Oh you, great organizer

 

Sit

 

Look within

And watch the thoughts

That run your day

 

Before digging one more hole

Planting another seed

Pulling out that weed

Tend to your mind’s garden

 

Take stock of its residents

Pests, parasites and predators

Half-truths, malicious lies and empty facts

You picked up off the streets

Absorbed from the paper

Ingested through the internet

 

Stop giving Despair a seat on your sofa

Feeding Anxiety your attention

Entertaining Contention with your mind

Imposters!

 

They devour your dreams’ buds

Suck your life’s forces

Consume your vision’s clarity

Clear them out!

 

Free ground for

Insight’s Stream

Inspiration’s Light

Intuition’s Soil

To settle

 

Let truth take root

Bringing meaning to matter

Order to your occupation

Purpose to your path

 

Then your soul can

Tend to its task

To bring to life

Your Spirit’s dream

 

And guided from within

Return to the outer world

To do

What needs doing


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A Winter’s Reflection

Mountain Climbing

 

I’ve tended to plot straight lines of perpetual ascent

Through sky, toward sun, to pinnacles.

 

But find myself plodding

Through unforeseen terrain,

Of vertical cliffs, sudden turns

Daunting drops,

Hoping I’d find my way.

 

From time to time

I’d reach a height

And stand aglow

Victorious

In bright of day.

 

But my stance would be shaken.

Life’s curves come unexpectedly.

I’d twist and twirl to depths

To dark crevices

To sit in shame.

 

In time

I’d settle my soul

Glance up through floating clouds

And reconsider a climb.

 

But like Sisyphus’s trial

My course had no end

The golden summit is not to be possessed.

 

 

Receiving the Present

 

Each morning, I awake.

 

Ideas flit through the curves of my brain:

“Can I build my body to bike to the beach?

Could folk dancing in my living room cultivate community?

Where would a solar shower sit in my yard?”

 

A train of thought rambles.

Temptation sweetly whistles

Ready to take me on a ride

To a perfect world.

 

But first

I step from the box of my house

And plant my curved feet on arching earth.

 

Oak leaves crackle

Bahia grass bows

Damp soil soothes

As I pace supple, solid ground,

left, right

left, right

to my growing garden.

 

On the edge

Between plant and sky

Conical okras twirl

Spiraling lima bean tendrils dance

In an ever-changing array.

 

I inhale sun’s rays and sky’s waves

Visitor that I am from the framed world

Of rectangular phones

Flat screens and

Linear text.

 

I stretch stiff straits from my back

And bend to touch musky earth.

 

I try to grasp Nature’s ways

On these brief, enlivening sojourns

But her welcoming smile spreads miles past my gaze

In expanses of mysterious, quiet passages

Of majestic pines, parading palms,

Fanciful ferns and nesting needles

From eons of her embroidered dance.

 

I find, though, I follow patterned paths

Fumbling on familiar steps

As when I started sowing seeds years back

Cherishing each broccoli rabe and tomato seedling sprouted

Running circles in search of spots to plant each life.

 

No matter I was running out of space

No thought of how I’d consume the fruit

No care for what I could tend to.

 

I felt the need to grasp each possibility

And bring it to fruition

In my foolish

Frenzied fight

Against loss

And letting go

Though I carried too much.

 

But Nature tarried on

As warm-hearted parent smiling at a child

Trying to mimic cherished ways.

 

Through seasons, I have watched.

Not all lettuce seeds sprout.

A portion of pumpkin seedlings thrive.

Zucchini arrives from nowhere and extends.

Thoughtful neighbors bring sweet potato starts.

 

Something’s always going.

Something’s always growing

Beyond my doing.

 

No need to grasp.

More’s on its way.

 

 

Consenting to Circles

 

Having inhaled natural day

I stroll back to my house.

 

Inside

Through open windows

Sun lightens walls

Breeze billows curtains

And brushes my cheek

Singing

Life is here

Life is here.

 

Reflecting on the present

I collect strands of thought

Still in my mind

And jot them down

To consider later

 

Then settle into the day’s doing.

 

It’s Monday

So I’ll wash cotton bedding

Sweep terrazzo floors

Shake and lay out woven carpets.

 

I’m trying to mimic life’s cycle

Tomorrow I’ll pay the water bill and record receipts

Wednesday, I’ll can split pea soup and make oat crackers

Everything in its time

By my design.

 

I used to do the fun stuff

Scribble down a song in my head

Call Jess to chat

Crochet cotton towels

Or what called in the moment

Read a text that came through

Or the book by my bed

Or walk in the rain.

 

I’d cram in dusting end tables

Pruning a bush overreaching the walkway

And mending torn spaghetti straps

When the need could no longer be ignored

Then rush back to the real stuff.

 

I’m learning

To tend to each task

In its time

As part of a circle –

Creation and dissolution.

 

I’m leaning into the picking up

And putting away

Reflecting on what’s past

Readying for what’s to come

Partaking in the process

Relaxed in the ordering.

 

Though I struggle still not to take on

More than fits

As waves of endeavors arise

I’m becoming aware of

Distinct strands of motion

And separating out what needs attending

What’s mine to do

And leaving the rest.

 

No longer seeking heights

But following as the path weaves

Its magnificent fabric

In mysterious folds.

 

Not focusing on gaining

Status nor goods

But garnering lessons

Of the Way.

 

Understanding

And good will

Are pinnacles

I walk toward

Through every hill and valley

Of my earthly path.

 

As the wheel of life turns

Compressing me as it churns

Breaking walls

Making my soul part

Of its masterpiece

Of which I choose to be a part

The work done

In my being

Unseen by outer world

Shines through all

I say and do.

 

As we enter quiet of winter

I’ll not turn to electric bulbs

Once dusk falls with fading sun

But settle into darkness

Putting aside fright

And the need to act.

 

I’ll fan the flame of inner light

Take stock with inner sight

Look upon barren landscapes

Ponder what’s beneath

 

Reflect on what’s passed

Consider what’s coming

And pause

Before moving on.

 

Sometimes, the way forward is back and around.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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The Right Use of Plastic

I’ve come to accept plastic, sort of reconciling myself to its place in the world. Where ever I ramble, I run into it – vacuum packed tofu at the farm stand, fluorescent-colored bottle lids on the forest floor, broken lawn chairs at the curbside. I have to face it — plastic is here to stay.

I always cringe, though, when a waitress asks if she can bring a ‘to go’ box for my leftovers. This usually means Styrofoam, a form of plastic I don’t consider a friend — nor does the planet. Once Styrofoam is set free to roam the earth, it’s anti-social — doesn’t break down, mix or mingle like wood and paper do, giving themselves to the making of soil, contributing to the life cycle.

In fact, Styrofoam may never decompose.

That it keeps to itself may be a good thing though, because when it circulates, it wreaks havoc, causing cancer. I won’t put Styrofoam out with my garbage. And when I invariably acquire a piece from a generous neighbor bringing Christmas cookies, I gracefully accept my plate then sequester it to the closet to use as a paint palette. But I won’t take home Styrofoam intentionally.

So I ask, Can I have a piece of tin foil to wrap my veggie curry in? My preference, though, is to bring home leftovers in a plastic bowl and lid I keep in a potluck kit in my trunk and am trying to get in the habit of bringing with me into restaurants.

Plastic has become a basic element of our mobile lifestyle. Light and unbreakable, it’s convenient to carry. Cheap to buy, plastic cups, forks and bottles are seen as disposables and discarded after one use.

But throwing out plastic is costly.

While a paper bag takes a month to become soil and a cardboard box around two, a plastic bag can take a good hundred years to break down. And when it does, it doesn’t blend, but stays intact as tiny particles that creep into ground water and litter oceans.

Plastic pills are taken up by plants, fish, animals and us, or just hang around. Pacific Ocean currents have collected some of our throw-aways in a swirling plastic soup the size of Texas. Fish dine on bottle caps; birds don six-pack ring necklaces. Come high tide, the sea may deliver our debris to our shore.

For now, plastic seems content to seep from containers into hot soup, leftovers and lattes. Tricksters, called BPA, sneak into bodies and mimic female hormones, messing with reproductive and nervous systems. Scientists have seen BPA handed down for three generations in fish.

Let’s face it. Plastic lingers — perhaps in protest of our disregard.

So, I limit my holdings, making friends with the few pieces I have, trying to reuse them for their duration. Once I’ve got plastic in my sight, I consider it an orphan, with nowhere to go, at least for a long time. Or, I eye it as a terrorist, holding it captive, protecting the world from its antics. And sometimes, I simply recognize its value and reuse it.

Walking my neighborhood on collection day, I rescue chairs, tables and shelves from languishing at the dump. Or, I postpone their recycling.

When possible, I recycle. But not all plastic can be recycled. And only about 5% of what can, does.

Perhaps plastic has made us lazy. Intended to make lives easier, disposables mean less washing of dishes. But our loathing of labor may have led to our scanty recycling. We’ve given our selves more work, though. Because plastic won’t play nice with nature, we’ve got to babysit and find things for it to do, lest we suffer its shenanigans.

I remember the invasion of plastics. As a child, I recoiled at inert orange, purple and pink impersonators upstaging painted clay bowls, horse hair and wooden brushes, rag dolls and cloth diapers. ‘Real’ items breathed with life forces, holding imprints of human touch. They were books to be read offering insights to life, engaging and peaceful to be around. But plastic was a soulless worker who came, got the job done and left without giving you the time of day. Cold and lifeless, it felt deadening. At home, I clung to dwindling natural objects for comfort and inspiration, rubbing my fingers along irregular surfaces, tracing circles of grain, following stitches in rows.

As a young adult, I combed stores for genuine items, to find few. Used goods shops became my treasure-trove of long forgotten wooden pails, tin watering cans and glass pitchers. I brought them home and sheltered them as a naturalist protects a preserve.

I am a purist. This is hard work. Plastic is ubiquitous.

Nowadays, plastic still stops me in my tracks. Yesterday, I shopped for cane sugar, which I use for its mildly sweet flavor and even handedness with my blood sugar level. I scoped out the bulk section of a local natural food store, hoping to scoop some cane sugar into a bag I brought and transfer it to a jar at home. There was none –only palm sugar, a new item. I placed a few crystals on my tongue. ”Not too sweet,” I thought, “but not as rich a flavor.” I moseyed around the aisle to find cane sugar sitting on a shelf encased in a hard plastic container. “Too bad!” I thought, then returned to the bulk section to take a few cups of palm sugar.

That night, I made ice cream with the new sugar but didn’t care as much for the taste. So, do I buy plastic wrapped cane sugar? Or search further hoping to find it in bulk and if not adjust to an alternative? I believe so.

Taking inventory of my trash a few years back, I gasped at the glut of plastic hummus containers, pasta wrappers, forks, spoons and water bottles. Shamed, I vowed to purchase as little as possible packaged in plastic and started making my own yogurt, crackers and tooth powder. This summer, I hope to start making shampoo and pasta and muslin sacks for bulk items and produce.

I now carry a glass water bottle and keep hard plastic plates, cloth napkins and metal cutlery in my car for use at potlucks and take out. I bring in a metal spoon when I frequent a frozen yogurt shop and have ventured into a take-out pizza parlor with my own plate. Perhaps one day this will be common.

What’s plastic good for and what’s best made with natural materials?

I have never been a disposable razor fan and have bought replaceable cartridges. While they consist of little plastic, their cost has skyrocketed. Flabbergasted, I thought back on my dad’s metal double-edged razor using a simple steel blade. To me, this is the pinnacle of razor technology.

I searched family run pharmacies then chain stores but found no such models. Finally, on line, I bought an ‘old fashioned’ razor with paper wrapped blades and no plastic! All for a fraction of the cost of a plastic one! Eureka! The process took nearly as much time as buying a car, but I’ve redirected myself to one more plastic-free path on which I more happily roam!

If I need to have plastic, I try to glean used items from the curbside or buy them in thrift shops. The fields are aplenty. Eco-architect, Richard Sowa, harvested disposed items to make a floating island– a lasagna of plastic and soil.

Shower curtains, sneakers and toothbrushes of recycled material abound. When a new plastic item is called for, recycled is my choice.

But there are things plastic should not get its fingers on. A clear bag holding thrown out food scraps is a sad sight. This imprisonment of banana peels and peach pits from organisms eager to turn them to dirt is a death sentence. I delight in delivering food remains to the ground where they can join the dance of life.
As for us, as I’ve heard said, Let’s care as much about the containers we use as the food we put in them.


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New Family Community

Last Sunday, a mixed age group of church friends and I are sitting around after service discussing where we and our elderly parents might live as we age.

“Years ago the Cooper family extended across Franklin County,” Mike, a recently retired professor, explains. “Then my mom and dad decide to become missionaries and leave for Kenya. This starts a trend. My wife and I have lived in Pennsylvania, Virginia and Florida to follow our work. My kids live in Pennsylvania, Los Angeles and Vietnam pursuing dreams. We are spread across the world.”

“I grew up in Ohio and left for Costa Rica in seventy-seven to join the Peace Corps,” Steve, a middle-aged business owner, adds. “I have no relations or close friends left in Ohio. Most of my friends are here in Sarasota. My kids live in New York and Minnesota. I don’t want to live in either place; I can’t take another snowstorm! My son and daughter don’t want to move down here. Besides, they have kids and lives of their own and can’t pick up and go!”

The rest of us share similar stories.

“It is best to have a power of attorney that lives near you,” Mike’s wife, Melissa, a retired accountant, shares. “Our daughter wants us to come live with them in Pennsylvania. I am not sure if that’s where we belong. Honestly, I don’t know where I belong.”

We grow silent.

Melissa continues, “I believe we are in a dilemma. We have no sense of home. “

Most of us nod in agreement.

I wonder about growing up watching my Aunt Stella care for my maternal grandfather in the Brooklyn brownstone her family lives in and inherits from him. I share about my dad’s mom, Katherine, who lives out her life alone in the Long Island home in which she raised the youngest of her nine kids. As she ages, uncles and cousins visit from around the island, checking in, bringing groceries and paying bills.

I would visit each Friday on my way home from work. During my last visits, as she lay in a hospital bed in her room, cared for by a visiting nurse, she bemoans feeling weak. She can’t get up and make me lentil soup but hopes she can next time. I thank her and smile.

One day, however, I tell her the truth, “Grandma, you are not going to get up and cook for me anymore. It is your turn now to rest and let others care for you.”

Two days later, she passes.

I tell how over the years aunts and uncles from both sides of my family move in with or live in duplexes attached to their children’s Staten Island and Long Island homes and are cared for in turn. Recently, however, my Aunt Trudy is the first to enter and die in a health care facility. Her only son, Cal, fears he can’t give her proper care.

“I want to go home!” Aunt Trudy uncharacteristically yells at Cal each time my cousin enters the room to visit.

After a few months, however, Aunt Trudy can no longer speak to me on the phone. Machines help her breathe and feed her liquids. My mom and dad visit, enter her room and think they are in the wrong place. They don’t recognize her; she is a skeleton. She is barely audible, but surviving, unsettled, until her last breath.

We shift in our seats and dispute the value of extended life support. We share fears of being left alone in a facility to wither.

I tell of my friend Carol misplaced in an Alzheimer’s facility by her son, who lives out of town. After a year-and-a-half, she finally convinces her doctor and him to transfer her to a more suitable assisted living facility. I visit her each month to take her out.

Last week, we face each other across a table. Her hand shakes as she lifts a spoonful of Greek lemon soup to her lips. She falters to find the name of the ailment that leads her to do so, smiling sweetly, assuring me many elderly suffer like this. As we stroll to the car after eating, I notice her gait steadier; physical therapy has helped.

“I don’t like living this way,” she murmurs from the passenger seat as we return to the facility. “I told my son I want to live in an apartment and he grew silent. I hung up on him.”

Melissa informs us, “They say you need to save up $350 thousand per person for three years of end of life care.”

The group gasps and groans.

“How have folks done it before?” I ask and then answer my question. “People took care of their own.”

“Most of the expenses are during the last three years of life,” Linda, a middle-aged home care nurse, explains. “Before that it is mostly bathing, dressing, feeding, and so on. This takes a big commitment from somebody. It is hard work that’s tiring!”

“Who’s going to do that these days?” Paula, architect and writer, responds. “Women have jobs outside the home and want to keep them!”

“My grandparents had five kids who took turns taking care of them,” Pete, a retired construction worker adds.

“We didn’t have enough kids,” Melissa and Mike turn to each other and laugh!

“I have a dream,” elder member John states. ”I imagine a community with houses on a shared property with a common gathering space and community gardens. I check the papers daily. Last week, I looked at 20 acres in Arcadia.”

“Yes,” I chime in. “People of all ages, elderly, middle age and youngsters, living together, with elders contributing as they can — their experience and abilities valued. I heard of someone traveling the world to study communities where folks live the longest. In these places, people don’t retire or stop meaningful work. They’re part of a community, contributing in ways they can. This is more life-giving than institutional health care. “

“My mom loved living in an assisted living facility,” Paula adds. “For the first time in her life, she didn’t have to shop, cook or clean. She was in heaven! And thank God. I had three kids to raise and responsibilities at work. I didn’t have energy to make sure she took her pills or time to drive her to doctors. Besides, we tried living in community in the seventies. It didn’t work. There were too many personalities. For example, we shared a car and a lawn mower. The car was supposed to be left in our neighbor’s driveway, the lawnmower in our garage. We got home late one night and left the car in our driveway. Big trouble! Plus I am too old for this. It takes a lot of energy!”

John continues, “I have energy for this!”

“Me too,” I add. “Friends and I have been talking about forming a multi-generational, cooperative household whose property can be passed on in posterity to its members. Years ago, folks handed down homes and land, keeping them in the family. Nowadays, we work hard to build something only to dissemble it before we die. We need something lasting in which put our energy. We need a new possibility.”

“The younger generation is living communally,” Steve adds. “My nephew, Joe, just graduated from college. He and his friends share a house partly because they can’t afford their own places but mainly they don’t want to live alone taking care of their own stuff. They share vehicles and take turns cooking, shopping, and gardening. They have time to hang out and do what matters to them! Joe works part time then makes performance art with his buddies on issues like racial injustice. ”

“Neat!” John responds. “I would love to live around creative souls like this!”

“That’s all well and good,” Paula states, “but young people listen to loud music and stay up all hours. Young kids run around and make noise. I like my fifties and older community. Here they come and go.”

Linda asks, “Can we, as church, simply look out for one another, like family, while our relatives are far away?”

“I like the idea of a duplex,” Pete says, “with someone younger living next door to help out with rides and meals. When I was fresh out of college, not knowing what to do, I moved to Texas to live in a room with my elder aunt and uncle. I mowed the lawn, collected yard waste, and ran errands, whatever they needed. Isn’t there someone who could do this for me?”

We pause and ponder.

“I think we are at a turning point, “I say. “For a few generations now, folks have left family, friends and land loosening bonds to follow an inner call.”

“Jesus said, if someone comes to me but cannot free himself from his father and his mother, from his wife and his children, from brothers and sisters, yes, even from his own soul, he cannot be my disciple.” Luke 14:26-27

Perhaps we have been on spiritual journeys and now it’s time to come together, in new ways,’ I add, “forming intentional families and communities.”

“Yes,” Linda shares, “Have you heard about Denmark group homes?”

“No,” Steve responds, “but I’ve heard of retired folks downsizing to share a house together, splitting responsibilities and resources.”

“My friend lives in an assisted living coop in Minnesota, near her daughter, and loves it,” Paula says.

“So many options to consider!” Pete concludes.


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Mission

I walk to my car after a presentation by Peace Corps volunteers. Tales told of rehabilitating lives, landscapes and structures in far off, impoverished countries get me thinking, What is my calling?

I recollect a story of Mother Teresa hearing of a Hindu family who had not eaten for a long time. She brings them rice and finds children with eyes shining with hunger. Their mom takes the rice and goes out. When she returns, Mother Teresa asks, “Where did you go? What did you do?”

The woman answers, “They are hungry also.”

And who are they? — A Muslim family.

Mother Teresa beams as the children and mom radiate with joy and peace on account of the mom’s love. Mother Teresa doesn’t bring more rice that evening because she wants them, Hindus and Muslims, to enjoy sharing, knowing this will feed a greater hunger.

I probe my pockets for keys, awestruck by this family’s love, pondering the essence of being poor.

Mother Teresa observed, “The spiritual poverty of the West is much greater than the physical poverty of India. In the West millions suffer terrible loneliness and emptiness, feel unloved and unwanted. People are not hungry in the physical sense, but in another way, knowing they need something more than money, yet not knowing what it is.”

I unlock my door acknowledging there are deeper wells to draw from than physical founts; poor folks are the blessed ones.

I bend into my car pondering the loneliness and emptiness in the West to which Mother Teresa points. I struggle to keep connected with others amidst independent living arrangements and time-consuming schedules. I grapple to keep afloat in a flood of belongings and groundswell of tasks. Mother Teresa speaks my mind, What do I do about my spiritual poverty amidst physical excess?

My work is right here.

I sit behind the wheel, mindful of my solitude. I’ve worked hard to create a natural space, just right for me, full of organic cotton, heirloom tomatoes and farmer writer Wendell Berry tales. Yet, I remain preoccupied with e-mails, paperwork and organizing. Writing unending lists of chores to do, struggling to squeeze in time to talk – much less sit – with friends and family.

I fasten my safety belt thinking, the American dream promises if I buy and own more, I make progress. And I do in a sense, when I don’t have enough. But past a point of sufficiency, I bloat my house with a closet clogged with shoes for any occasion, a pantry packed with enough pasta to feed the neighborhood and a table top buried beneath piles of magazines I never look through. At this point, for me, having less is moving forward.

I start my car’s engine and hear Jackson Browne swoon:

These times are famine for the soul while for the senses it’s a feast…

And there’s a God-sized hunger underneath the laughing and the rage (Looking East)

 

I drive home determined to better feed my soul and cut down on physical preoccupation. As cars race past on the expressway, I wonder what’s essential and what’s unnecessary, best to let pass by. The thought of hungry folks, scantily clad in tin shacks helps me trim the fat. A bowl of rice and beans, a hat and coat, walls and a roof are basically what I require.

I drive past another newly constructed mall thinking, I need to pare down.

As I prepare to change lanes, I glance in my rear view mirror remembering as a teen feeling overwhelmed and saddened in stores. Sprawling selections of milk ­- one percent, no fat, low fat and whole – beside aisles of shampoo, laundry detergent and toilet paper elicit endless decisions about trivial pursuits. Over time, though, I grow concerned about choosing just the right item for me and quiver between buying green leaf lettuce and romaine. Now I see that getting tied up in meaningless decisions eats up my energy and deprives my soul of simply being satisfied and grateful for food.

As I signal and look to the right, I remember living in Asheville, North Carolina. In this mecca of natural and cultural beauty, my greatest joy is visiting nursing homes to sit and sing with the elderly. Amid empty halls and vacant rooms dotted with card tables, pale, languid faces stare into space. My guitar strings shimmer. Heads and voices lift together in song: “You are my sunshine, my only sunshine…” Eyes connect in bare stillness, souls unite. I am fed beyond the sustenance of Jackson Browne’s lyrics and Mother Teresa’s tales.

Real connections feed me.

I turn off the AC, roll down the window and sense the heat of the day sting my cheek. Sweat strolls down my rib. A flock of ibis glide by in formation. Hip hop pulsates from a Corvette speeding by. Less buffered, I am in touch.

I exit and U-turn, forgoing thrift store shopping to drive to a hospice care facility and be with my 58 year old friend Richard, spending his last days alone. Gaunt and listless, plodding behind his walker, he beckons me to a garden. We shuffle between palms, love grass and hibiscus and sit on a wooden bench. I slow my breath to settle stirring thoughts and be with him. He soaks in his surroundings and utters labored syllables spelling out his surrender and acceptance. Serenity fills the air. We inhale and exhale the lightness of being. And embrace our goodbyes.

Awakened to the pulse of life, I stroll to my car.

I’ve been isolated and absorbed, caught in a web of material comfort and ease. Casting it away and reaching out to others, I come alive and nourished.

I sit behind the wheel and leave the door ajar. Sun illumines my face. I reach for my calendar and pore over tasks of the week weighing their importance. I make a list of names of folks in need.

Budding branches reach to the sun. When laden with fruit, they bow to the ground. I have more than I need. I must bend down and offer my fill. When I am emptied, I will receive more.

Beside my parked car a red jacaranda sways in the wind. I am reminded of Carol, once vibrant, glowing with life. Now 76, she is trapped in an Alzheimer’s care facility. She got lost driving, couldn’t find her way home. Her son flew down from Philadelphia for the weekend, sold her red hybrid Honda, ruby love seat and crimson-doored house — without her consent. He then placed her in a facility for safe keeping because her memory is weakening. I call her to make plans to visit.

I drive home and clear the cooler, umbrella and beach chair from my back seat to make room for Carol’s wheel chair.

Days later I travel across town. As I wheel Carol through the facility, we watch two dazed women gazing at a flittering TV screen and a man wandering, giggling into space. I notice Carol’s bold demeanor is dulled after a few weeks’ immersion in this muted world. I pull open my passenger door. She struggles to lift her troubled body up holding onto the window frame then shuffles onto the seat. Looking forward she pronounces, I want my car back.

I nod in silence, sit in the driver’s seat and maneuver our way out of the parking lot. Slowly, grasping for words, Carol composes the landscape of delusional characters with whom she dwells, from whom she seeks relief. My heart sinks, knowing she does not belong here, yet aware there is little I can do but take her out for brief respites and listen.

Over the ensuing months, I carve space in my schedule to be with Carol and help carry her load. Her forbearance, persistence and composure are gifts to me.

Perhaps life is not an upward climb, but a spiral trajectory, looping between loss and gain, need and plenty, weakness and strength – both essential to growth and well-being.

One year later, through determination and will, Carol persuades her doctors and son to place her in a more suitable assisted living facility. Our world is set aright. My heart resounds, Hallelujah!

I am driving to Salvation Army with a backseat of boxes containing the tofu maker I’ve never used, old Yes magazines and dusty snow boots. I think of my friend Joe, on disability, unable to work. His trust fund ran out and he can no longer pay rent. He’s terrified he’ll be homeless as New York’s frigid winter approaches. Ashamed, I squirm, I’m here in Florida, grappling to shed frivolity, while Joe is scuffling to find a friend’s couch to sleep on to keep him off the icy streets.

What can I do to help him get what he needs? How can I free myself from excess, which leaves others without enough? How can we come from our separateness to share?

 

Excerpt of Mother Theresa’s address at the United Nations’ “International Conference on Population and Development”, held in Cairo on Sept 5 -13, 1994


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Turning

It is so easy, especially during the holidays, to get caught up in buying things and entertaining ourselves. The weight of advertisements, social and familial expectations and habit draw us to do so. But, do these truly nourish us or simply distract us from what is most essential? I recently watched a DVD which reminded me of practices I feel we would do well to engage in, particularly during this time of year.

The DVD “Healing” was about the work of a humble Brazilian tailor, with a second grade education, who channels the spirits of deceased healers and saints. Its testimonies tell of healings through this man, named John of God, who takes neither fees nor credit for his work.

Images of folks waiting in line for healing deeply touched me. Individuals sought cures for cancer, heart disease and depression as they stood alone or held one another. Some walked with clubbed foot, crutches, or were pushed in wheel chairs. People were candidly present with their difficulties, pensive and anxious for release. These folks were facing themselves and the world straight on, without pretense. Watching them, I felt as if I had risen out of a rabbit hole, witness to a world turned around, where people sought and found redemption.

What impressed me most was that their healings involved hard work.  Folks were assisted in remembering choices they had made that took them off course, away from the paths knew they were here to follow, ones grounded in love and peace. By rethinking their decisions and changing direction, they became whole. A woman with breast cancer talked about releasing layers of grieving over the death of her mother, enabling her to start moving forward. A gentleman with HIV gave up negative beliefs and patterns, diminishing his ego, and not only got rid of AIDS, but the reasons for it. Phoebe from Australia said she travelled the world to find out what it means to be alive. She now knows to sit, close her eyes and go inside to find out. One of John of God’s helpers pointed out that we unknowingly pollute our minds, souls and bodies with negative thoughts and actions and need to make conscious choices to be more loving, kind and understanding if we wish to become whole.

Listening, I was shed of distractions. These people were truly engaged in meaningful activities.  I couldn’t help but wonder what the world would be like if we all faced our pain, self-centeredness and confusion, and transformed our negative thoughts and actions. How much of what we struggle with most would simply disappear?

During this time when we come together to celebrate the overcoming of darkness with light, what better preparation is there than to face our inner darkness with the light of love? What better activity than coming to terms with our personal histories, to rethink priorities, attitudes, and practices. And when better to do so, than during holiday vacation when we have the time to sit by ourselves or with one another, in nature and with God?

We have so much these days that it seems that the real goal is not to get and do more, but to have and do less, to create space in which to sort through things and find what is already here. Once our basic needs are met, we have higher tasks to pursue — those of caring for and sharing with one another. In so doing, we become fully alive and allow others to do the same. In contrast to the commotion we stir up with our concerns and affairs, the thought of this simple practice calms me.

The folks in the DVD are a community turned around — no longer striving outwardly for material gain and stature to find meaning, but looking within for realization of truth and cultivation of wholesome living.  These are steps accessible and of benefit to all of us.

To me, this is a turning we all can make to put things in place.

 

‘Tis the gift to be simple

‘Tis the gift to be free

‘Tis the gift to come down where we ought to be

And when we find ourselves in the place just right

“Twill be in the valley of love and delight

 

 When true simplicity is gained

To bow and to bend we shan’t be ashamed

To turn, turn will be our delight

‘Til by turning, turning we come ‘round right

 

from Simple Gifts, written by Shaker Elder Joseph Brackett, Jr. in 1848


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Man Made

I had suspected so much, years ago, but now I am convinced. Our lifestyle has created many of the health issues we face.  I have experienced this personally.

As a youngster growing up in the 70’s on Long Island, I was starved for nourishment. It wasn’t that I didn’t eat: I consumed typical meals of boxed cereal breakfasts, white bread, cold cut and iceberg lettuce lunches, boxed macaroni & cheese and hot dog dinners. I ate, but didn’t feel fed, and so I ate more. I was preoccupied with my need for nourishment, a disorder of sorts. Fortunately, at 16, I discovered the local health food store and in it, wholegrain cereals and breads, a variety of beans, organic vegetables and naturally sweetened desserts. By eating “health foods”, I felt satisfied for the first time; my cravings diminished, energy levels raised and my sense of well-being developed. Yet, I was eating on the fringe; people looked at my food with suspicion and few social situations offered food I could comfortably eat.

At the same time, I studied nutrition books. I quickly become overwhelmed by the plethora of information on vitamin and mineral requirements, recommended calorie and fat intake and salt and sugar issues. Rather than navigate this web of data, I decided to simply eat naturally. If my grandmother wouldn’t recognize it as food, neither would I. Since then, I have eaten natural foods, developing a sense of what best to eat at times, and continuing to feel well-nourished.

So much is like this. As a society, we tamper with nature, and individually, we suffer the effects.  One by one we seek answers, often accepting diagnoses, drugs and therapies, identifying us as ill. Meanwhile, the cultural norms which create and promote our disorders remain communally embraced and largely unexamined.

In a few generations, we have abandoned lives of farming and canning, lifting and bending with the rhythms of the seasons. We have stopped living in contact with the living, breathing earth. We now push buttons, watch fast moving images, and listen to mechanized sounds, in rooms of artificial light and conditioned air, as we scramble to meet man-made schedules.  How can we know of the subtle shifts between light and dark or observe the patterns of nature which might inform us? We no longer write letters nor wait for mail, chop wood nor cook food we’ve grown over fires we’ve built. Instead, we constantly respond to our phones’ jingles, always on call to meet perceived needs and hastily remove plastic coverings from processed foods to zap them in the microwave. How can we know of the passage of time or of the processes of growth and decay?

Naturally, we experience sensory overload, processing difficulty, burn out and angst. Hyperactivity, attention deficit, hypersensitivity and anxiety have markedly increased amongst youth. Born to a world of abstractions and distractions, babies receive little to grasp onto and piece together as real. Many feed on chemical formulas in place of mothers’ milkwhich promotes health, growth, immunity and development. Some bypass crawling  which buildsneuropath ways critical to balance, spinal alignment, visual-spatial skills, and socio-emotional development.  Intricate, manufactured plastic toys for defined purposes replace simple homemade wooden and cloth objects  through which a child can feel nature’s or a human’s touch and upon which one can project his/her imagination. Hours are spent viewing TV. screens and playing video games, overloading one’s senses with illusory ideas of space and time while few woods remain, or are deemed safe enough, in which to explore the multi-faceted dimensions of the wild. We have created a world in which children are starved of what is essential to the development of healthy bodies, minds and souls and then we find complex solutions to their problems.

Without recognizing and valuing natural processes, we separate from our source and like a flower in a vase, dry up. Running on treadmills we’ve created, looking for solutions to our difficulties, won’t resolve our issues as would our simply stepping off our manmade machinery and walking on more natural paths.